GAMER Project - New Electrolyser System to Make Green Hydrogen Production More Competitive


Carbon Recycling International (CRI) is a part of a consortium of industrial partners and research centres from Norway, Spain and the Netherlands that will develop a novel cost-effective tubular Proton Ceramic Electrolyser unit designed achieve higher efficiency in production of pure dry pressurised hydrogen when integrated in a steam electrolyser system. The project, which is fully funded by a 3 million EUR grant from the EU Horizon 2020 Spire Research Programme, aims to establish the technology required for commercialisation of a Proton Ceramic Electrolyser system capable of improving the competitiveness of green hydrogen production.

Inital work on the development of the innovative Tubular Proton Ceramic Electrolyser technology was carried out by the consortium in the ELECTRA project that ended in 2017. In the second phase, entitled GAMER, promising results from ELECTRA will be exploited to design, build and operate a prototype device over a period of 2000 hours. The GAMER consortium will also build advanced computer modelling and simulation tools, enabling the consortium to explore alternative designs to take further steps towards introducing this electrolyser technology to the market, and by doing so, create a breakthrough in the field.

Hydrogen electolysers are used to decompose water into oxygen and hydrogen gas by passing an electric current through water. Total energy demand drops considerably when water is shifted from liquid to gas phase and development of high-temperature electrolysis has therefore received continuing attention. Higher operating temperatures, removal of water vapour from the hydrogen, instability and thermal stress remain significant challenges for the development of high-temperature electrolysers. The Proton Ceramic Electrolyser design, composed of tubular proton conducting ceramic cells encased in steel shells, aims to overcome these challenges.

The Proton Ceramic Electrolyser will be thermally coupled to waste heat sources in industrial plants to achieve. The combination of the novel design and efficient heat integration will enable the system to achieve significantly higher combined electrical and heat efficiency than current alternatives. Although hydrogen from renewable electricity has a much lower carbon footprint than hydrogen obtained from petrochemical or natural gas sources, traditional industry has been reluctant to abandon the traditional methods for economic reasons. The Proton Ceramic Electrolyser technology could enable industrial producers to reduce energy consumption in renewable hydrogen production, providing an even more competitive and environmentally sound alternative to the traditional fossil energy based hydrogen production method.

 
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This project has received funding from the Fuel Cells and Hydrogen 2 Joint Undertaking under grant agreement (number 779486). This Joint Undertaking receives support from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme, Hydrogen Europe and Hydrogen Europe research


 
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